LAW

Blog

Do I Need An Attorney For California Probate?

Do I Need An Attorney For California Probate?

Approaching a probate law firm in Los Angeles can be quite intimidating, especially if you’re going through the process for the first time. You might even be wondering if a probate attorney can help you navigate your Los Angeles assets at all, especially if you’ve recently lost a loved one.

read more
What Questions Should I Ask My Estate Planning Attorney

What Questions Should I Ask My Estate Planning Attorney

Before you go around looking for the best real estate attorney in Los Angeles to help you with estate planning, you need to be prepared with a set of questions they must be ready to answer. You’ll likely run into an attorney who needs to get paid by the hour, so you have to let those hours count!

read more
Estate Planning: Understanding Living Trusts

Estate Planning: Understanding Living Trusts

When trying to figure out how estate planning works in Los Angeles, you might chance upon the option to develop a living trust. Setting one up with an estate planning lawyer you trust could not only safeguard your Los Angeles assets from scrutiny, but provide a detailed plan after your passing to guide your family as they navigate next steps.

read more
Understanding The Landlord Tenant Law In Los Angeles

Understanding The Landlord Tenant Law In Los Angeles

Due to the high cost of homeownership, it is estimated that more than half of all those living in Los Angeles are currently renting. At roughly 64%, Los Angeles has the fourth-highest percentage of renters in any major US metropolitan.

read more
Navigating Through Bankruptcy In Los Angeles

Navigating Through Bankruptcy In Los Angeles

In 2004, more than 60,000 California natives sought either Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy in their district (these include the Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, Ventura, San Luis Obispo, San Bernardino, and Santa Barbara counties). In 2006, the first full year the new rules of bankruptcy were enacted, almost 18,000 people filed for bankruptcy, which translates to 71% less from just two years prior.

read more